New Way to Cool Computer Chips Involves Laser Metal Printing

Researchers from Binghamton University’s Mechanical Engineering Department have developed a manufacturing technique that will keep electronics cooler by 10 degrees Celsius (18 degrees Fahrenheit), allowing for faster, more efficient computation. Assistant Professor Scott Schiffres and graduate students Arad Azizi and Matthias A.

Composite Material can Cool itself Down Under Extreme Temperatures

A cutting-edge material, inspired by nature, that can regulate its own temperature and could equally be used to treat burns and help space capsules withstand atmospheric forces is under development at the University of Nottingham. The research paper, Temperature – dependent polymer

Electronic Component Testing: A Non-Contact Sport

Electronics don’t like it hot. That’s why electronic systems designers are looking for ways to keep their components cool while the sizes of their devices shrink. As chips get smaller and their densities within components grow, heat can become a real problem—not